Skip to Content

Category: Arts in Community

Moving Forward With Grace

Moving Forward With Grace

Posted: April 12, 2018

Sometimes, getting somewhere else requires knowing where you are. Stepping into leadership at a decades-old organization can be like that; you'll need your bearings. Kathryn Lovinsky had them when she started at the nonprofit Grass Roots Arts and Community Effort (G.R.A.C.E.). Kathryn knows the magic of making art. She knows Hardwick. Now she is discovering the ways to balance longstanding tradition with new ideas. Hardwick is a Northeast Kingdom town with a population of about 3,000 and chartered in 1781. The Firehouse was built in 1885. G.R.A.C.E. was founded in 1975; they bought and moved into the Firehouse in the early 2000s. Kathryn became executive director in September 2015. Read More
Building the Barrette

Building the Barrette

Posted: March 16, 2018

A beautiful new arts center opened in the heart of White River Junction's downtown in 2015. The Barrette Center for the Arts houses an intimate 240 seat modified thrust performance space and has all the technical capabilities you would hope for. The backstage supports large and small cast productions with rehearsal space matched to the size of the stage used in performance. The lobby is fronted by an outdoor plaza and is enclosed by an inviting windowed street front. The building and spaces within the building have been designed to meet accessibility needs — including an assisted listening system in the theater itself. Managing Director Eric Bunge reported, "People tell us the Barrette Center for the Arts is their favorite place to see live theater. We couldn't ask for a better testimonial." Then, he told us more. Read More
Why Watch Artists

Why Watch Artists

Posted: March 1, 2018

Visual artists are at a disadvantage in our culture these days because their contribution to our social discourse is often free of those things that demand our collective attention. The art may be flashy and eye-catching, but the person behind the art often isn't and that makes it difficult to cultivate fame and participate in a celebrity culture. Social media — Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, and so on — requires a constant stream of images and stories. For an artist who may make a few dozen paintings a year, it is hard to keep up. But that is only part of it. Read More
Mountains Reign, Art Lovers Gain

Mountains Reign, Art Lovers Gain

Posted: February 15, 2018

Picture a perfect day for shredding the slopes: fresh white powder, bluebird sky, après drinks near a roaring fire. When these images flood our screens, it’s enough to make anyone long for a ski bum lifestyle. And Vermonters know these dreamy days aren’t just for shredding. After the sun has gone down or your legs have grown tired, the arts will be waiting. What better place to start than in Stowe? Stowe Mountain Resort has been a Vermont skiing staple for decades and garnered recent attention when it was purchased by Colorado-based Vail Resorts. This mountain village is noteworthy for its arts scene as well. Read More
Spread the News

Spread the News

Posted: January 17, 2018

If Bad News Fatigue Syndrome (BNFS) is real, we are all at risk. Every day we hear about forests burning, cities flooding, and hands reaching for scary buttons. This nonstop outpouring of concerning information can be overwhelming. If good news can serve as an antidote to BNFS, we are lucky to be in Vermont — a funky little state with abundant art. Creativity is considered an asset. Communities support artistic enterprises, and more and more children are reaping the benefits of arts in education. There is good news here. We need to hear it, and we need to share it. As Erin Narey from Catamount Arts in St. Johnsbury enthused, “Good news? I am all about it.” Read More
Need for Artist Voices Never Greater

Need for Artist Voices Never Greater

Posted: December 14, 2017

I’ve been asked often this year by young writers — and a few dozen young painters, dancers, actors, filmmakers, and photographers I was mentoring at an artists’ retreat in Southern California — whether I view all art as activism. I wasn’t asked that question much in the previous generation and a half in which I have been writing novels. But this has been a charged year and I don’t expect 2018 to be any less fraught. All artists are grappling with — and will continue to grapple with — their place in the current social and political landscape: when is art activism and when is it escapism? Read More