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Arts Calendar: Northern Vermont

Thursday, June 14, 2018

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May
3
2018
– THRU –
Jun
19
2018

Tim Brookes - The Enigmatic Art of Endangered Alphabets

Tim Brookes - The Enigmatic Art of Endangered Alphabets Vermont Arts 2018
Description:

The Enigmatic Art of Endangered Alphabets, an exhibit of wood carvings by Tim Brookes, will exhibit at the Gallery at River Arts May 3 – June 19, 2018.

The non-profit Endangered Alphabets Project, founded in 2010, flourishes on the borderlands between art and woodwork, painting and typography, linguistics and anthropology, creative design and cultural preservation, ethnography and spirituality. Originally intended to preserve some of the world’s endangered writing systems by carving them in boards of beautiful Vermont curly maple, the Alphabets have expanded to encompass artwork, poetry, sound sculpture, and furniture.

The shapes incorporated in writing reflect our sense of what comes naturally to the human body—the radius-over-ulna turn of the wrist, the sweep of the arm, the turn of the shoulders, the leaning-forward downstroke obeying gravity—and what we think of as ideal forms: the circle, the line, the right angle, the set of parallels, symmetry and balance. The shapes incorporated in wood grain reflect a deeper, older set of forces: annual sun-and-rain weather cycles depicted in growth rings; the complex rhythms of wind stressing trees at the edge of a forest. These carvings are a conversation between the two sets of patterns, the urgent desire to communicate in human time set against the longer, slower rhythms of the natural world. The carvings have been displayed at the Smithsonian Institution, Yale, Harvard, the universities of Cambridge and Barcelona, and other colleges, universities, and libraries across North America.

Tuesday, June 19, 3:00p.m.
River Arts Center, 74 Pleasant Street, Morrisville, VT

On June 19 at 3:00p.m., Tim Brookes will be speaking on Endangered Alphabets, Cultural Erosion, and the Future of the Written Word. What does the age of digital convergence, Facebook, and globalization mean for the future of the written word? Writer/carver/painter Tim Brookes offers remarkable and thought-provoking perspective on this question by looking at a range of forms of writing from all over the world that are in danger of extinction. He displays a carving of a piece of text in each script, leading a discussion on how technology will help—and always has helped—define the nature of communication, and shows how the story of a culture can be seen in its writing, even if that writing is (as in these examples) beautiful, utterly unfamiliar, and disappearing. This talk is in conjunction with Tim Brooke’s exhibit “The Enigmatic Art of Endangered Alphabets.” The talk is free, open to the public, and accessible to those with disabilities. For more information, contact Heidi@RiverArtsVT.org.

Endangered Alphabets, Cultural Erosion, and the Future of the Written Word is a Vermont Humanities Council program hosted by River Arts. (Supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the NEH or VHC.)

Time: 5/3/18 9:00am - 6/19/18 4:00pm
Location: River Arts, Morrisville
May
3
2018
– THRU –
Jun
24
2018

Russians and Friends

Russians and Friends Vermont Arts 2018
Description:

Bryan Memorial Gallery presents The Russians and Friends, a selection of paintings by four visiting artists from Russia, and some American friends, who recently painted together in Jeffersonville.

Bryan Menorial gallery is at 180 Main Street, Jeffesonville, VT 802-644-5100. A digital preview of this exhibit can be seen at www.bryangallery.org. Gallery hours are Thursday-Sunday 11-4 and by appointment any time.

Opening reception Sunday May 6th. Artist Roundtable at 1:00pm. Reception 2-4pm.

contact: Mickey Myers : mickey@bryangallery.org

Time: 5/3/18 11:00am - 6/24/18 4:00pm
Location: Bryan Memorial Gallery, Jeffersonville
Jun
14
2018
– THRU –
Jun
24
2018

The Paintings of Louis Fried

The Paintings of Louis Fried
Description:

ST JOHNSBURY—Catamount Arts is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings by Louis Fried (1893-1957) on view in the Main Gallery from June 14-24, 2018. Work by this talented self-taught artist comes from the collection of his extended family, many of whom are local. The painter Louis Fried was grandfather to Geoff Fried of Danville, Kim Fried of East Burke, the late Rian Fried, formerly of Stannard, and Toby Fried of Hannover, NH. He was also the great-grandfather of Jody Fried of Kirby, current Director of Catamount Arts. A special wine and cheese reception honoring the accomplishments of Louis Fried and his family will be held on Sunday, June 24 from 3-5 pm, with remarks at 4 pm. All are welcome to attend.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION: The paintings of Louis Fried communicate a compelling interpretation of landscape. Initially, Fried began to paint as a way to recover from a debilitating stroke, but he grew to consider it a serious endeavor. Like many self-taught artists, he possessed a unique vision and a determination to reveal that vision. Thickly applied paint indicates profound love of material. Dynamic compositions give evidence to a kind of restless energy. Whether concentrating on the rush of water falling over rock or trees coming into bloom, Louis Fried tackled each composition with confidence and creativity—a reflection perhaps on how he approached life.
Yet this exhibition is not simply a collection of paintings by one uniquely talented individual. It also a story of an immigrant experience played out generation after generation—not just within the Fried Family, but within families of so many who have come or hope to come to America.

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Born in Minsk, Russia in 1893, Louis Fried and his future wife Helen immigrated to New York City in 1909, where they married and raised a family. Like many immigrants to the United States at the turn of the last century, they were hard-working entrepreneurs, eager to avail themselves of the opportunities their new country had to offer. They opened a clothing store in Brooklyn and then a toy stop in the Bronx, running successful businesses until Louis was half paralyzed by a stroke at age 57. He regained partial use of his faculties only through an intensive course of art therapy, which awakened an interest in painting. Encouraged by his close friend Solomon Lerner, a prominent New York artist, Louis pursued this passion, painting numerous landscapes inspired by travel to places like Lake Champlain in Vermont, which he called “a noisy little sea.”

ABOUT THE FRIED FAMILY The story of the Fried family reflects a truly American experience, as well as the hopes and dreams of immigrant families in general. Seeking a new life, Louis and Helen Fried left behind the political turmoil of Tzarist Russia, where opportunities were extremely limited. In the United States they were able to become successful business owners and see their three children excel at Columbia, Cornell and Purdue before going on to successful careers themselves. As a prominent labor leader, their oldest son Milton traveled with the US State Department to Prague, Paris and Israel. Their daughter Esther became a geologist and educator, and their youngest son Maurice, an agricultural researcher for the United Nations, moved to Vienna, Austria, where he and his wife Enid raised six sons. Eventually, the family was reunited in America. Esther and her husband Ray Fagan lived in Virginia, where Esther worked to help immigrants and refugees become US citizens. Milton and Philoine returned to New York to continue work as labor activists. Maurice and Enid moved to Washington, DC, where he worked at the National Academy of Sciences.

This story of immigrant success and service to others continued down through generations. Esther’s daughters worked in education and health. Milton and Philoine’s sons pursued the arts, while Maurice and Enid’s sons settled in homes from Alaska to New Hampshire, working in the fields of education, economics, medicine, and culinary art. The family maintains a strong presence in Vermont. Milton’s son Geoffrey lives with his wife Joanna in Peacham, while Maurice’s sons Rian and Kim built homesteads in the Northeast Kingdom and dedicated themselves to community service. Rian founded Clean Yield Asset Management, a socially responsible investment firm, which led to Sterling College establishing the Rian Fried Center for Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems after his untimely death in 2013. Rian’s brother Kim was on the Board of Rural Edge, a regional non-profit housing organization, and serves on the Newark Planning Commission. His wife Nancy is on the Northeast Kingdom Community Action Board, and their son Jody is the Executive Director of Catamount Arts in St. Johnsbury.

ABOUT CATAMOUNT ARTS: As northern New England’s largest independent arts center, Catamount Arts hosts a diversified program in film, music, theater, dance, and art. Founded in 1975, it began as a traveling 16 mm film series for rural Vermonters. Today the organization operates out of a newly renovated facility, presenting screenings of world-class film; live simulcasts of the Metropolitan Opera, the Bolshoi Ballet, and London’s National Theatre; and performances by such nationally recognized touring artists as Grammy nominee Neko Case, and talented local performers.

Catamount Arts is located at 115 Eastern Avenue in downtown St. Johnsbury, Vermont. The Catamount Arts Gallery is adjacent to two cinema-screening rooms, and will normally be open every day from 1 pm until 9:30 pm. For more information, call (802) 748-2600 or visit www.catamountarts.org.

Time: 6/14/18 12:00am - 6/24/18 11:59pm
Location: Catamount Arts Gallery, Saint Johnsbury
May
6
2018
– THRU –
Jun
29
2018

Rachel Moore - Traces

Rachel Moore - Traces Vermont Arts 2018
Description:

Rachel Moore - Traces
On view: May 6 through June 29, 2018

EDGEWATER GALLERY at Stowe
151 Main Street • Stowe, Vermont • 802.760.6785

Edgewater Gallery at Stowe unveils a special selection from Rachel Moore’s complete body of work with brand new sculptural pieces in her solo exhibition Traces . The exhibition will be on view May 6th through June 29th, with a reception on Friday, May 11th from 5:30-7:00pm. The artist talk will begin at 6:00pm.

Moore’s work is steeped in careful attention to pattern language and shifts. Her materials range from watercolor and graphite on paper, to blown and cast glass, to ink on vellum and more. Traces ties together many thematic patterns in the artist’s work honoring the environment with a dialogue on prevailing conditions. Minimalist in color, her installations are infinitely rich in carefully considered materials and surfaces with an ethereal elegance and sophistication. Paying homage to presence in absence, many of her sculptural pieces refer to measurable data in climate change as well as migration patterns. Each movement, memory, presence and energy leaves a trace. This exhibition echoes traces of beauty in our global community.

Rachel Moore is a multidisciplinary artist working in mixed media sculpture, installation, drawing, and social practice. Moore uses maps, cultural and religious icons, text, and sculptural replications of objects from daily life to respond to social and political movements, often in poetic and haunting ways. In her social practice, she has used storytelling to create relationships of understanding and as a way to bring awareness to multicultural histories, in some cases, asserting a culture’s rightful place in history.

Moore’s work has been featured in international museums and galleries, on Art21’s “Inside the Artist’s Studio” and she is the recipient of numerous grants and awards.The artist is represented by Edgewater Gallery, Stowe, VT; Stewart Gallery, Boise, ID; and Traver Gallery, Seattle, WA. She lives and works in Vermont.

For further information on Rachel Moore and her exhibition, please call the gallery at 802-760-6785, email Kelly Holt (kelly@edgewatergallery-vt.com), or visit edgewatergallery-vt.com.

Edgewater Gallery at Stowe hours:
Wednesday-Thursday 10am-5pm, Friday-Saturday 10am-6pm, Sunday 10am-4pm. Closed Monday & Tuesday.

Location: Edgewater Gallery, Stowe
Feb
27
2018
– THRU –
Jun
30
2018

Vermont Landscapes

Vermont Landscapes Vermont Arts 2018
Description:

Vermont Landscapes, a selection of paintings of Vermont, is installed in the public spaces of Lamoille County Courthouse through June 30. Organized by Bryan Memorial Gallery, the exhibition includes oils, watercolors, monoprints, pastels, and acrylics. The Courthouse is open to guests, except between noon and 12:30. There is no charge for this exhibit. Image is from a watercolor by Vladimir Vagin.

Time: 2/27/18 8:00am - 6/30/18 4:30pm
Location: Lamoille County Courthouse, Hyde Park
Jun
13
2018
– THRU –
Jun
30
2018

"Gypsy" at Stowe Theatre Guild

"Gypsy" at Stowe Theatre Guild
Description:

The story of the ultimate show mother and the reluctant vaudeville star — a timeless classic, always reminding us to “Sing out, Louise!”

Stowe Theatre Guild presents "Gypsy," the classic Broadway musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by Arthur Laurents.

Show dates are Wednesdays through Saturdays, June 13-16, June 20-23 and June 27-30, with all shows starting at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are $20 for adults, $18 for students and $14 for children (ages 12 and under).

To buy show tickets, visit www.stowetheatre.com, email tickets@stowetheatre.com or call 802-253-3961.

Time: 6/13/18 7:30pm - 6/30/18 10:00pm
Location: Town Hall Theatre, 67 Main St., Stowe
Jun
6
2018
– THRU –
Jul
8
2018

One Way, Many Paths: An Artist Walks the Camino

One Way, Many Paths: An Artist Walks the Camino Vermont Arts 2018
Description:

ON VIEW IN THE GALLERY JUNE 5 TO JULY 8.
Discover Spain’s El Camino de Santiago (Way of St. James) through the paintings of Vermont artist Susan Abbott. This exhibition evokes the ever-changing, panoramic landscape she experienced during her transformative journey walking the historic road. Susan set out from St. Jean Pied de Port, the traditional Camino starting point on the French side of the Pyrenees, carrying a 15-pound backpack that included sketchbooks, painting supplies, and her journal. Two months and 590 miles later, she arrived on the Atlantic coast with drawings, watercolors, poems, and diaries documenting the pilgrimage. Painted in her Vermont studio, each square painting displays Abbott’s hallmark style of exciting color and striking composition, and the series together creates a powerful narrative about the rich diversity of place that is available to us in our world today, if we venture out to find it.

Time: 6/6/18 9:00am - 7/8/18 9:00pm
Location: Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick St., Greensboro
Dec
22
2017
– THRU –
Sep
30
2018

Dreamcatcher

Dreamcatcher Vermont Arts 2018
Description:

A large-scale, interactive sculpture installation by LA-based artist James Peterson, inspired by magical Siberian ice caves. Presented by Spruce Peak at Stowe, produced and curated by Helen Day Art Center. Located in the Spruce Peak Village Center, outside Spa Entrance. Open to the public all hours.

Time: 12/22/17 12:00am - 9/30/18 12:00am
Location: Spruce Peak Village Center, Stowe