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Arts Calendar: Lecture

Thursday, March 28, 2019
Mar
28
2019

Silent Partner: Creating Live Scores for Movies from the 1920s

Silent Partner: Creating Live Scores for Movies from the 1920s
Description:

Green Mountain Academy for Lifelong Learning (GMALL) welcomes Wesleyan University Professor Ben Model to talk about silent film scores. In this entertaining talk, film historian and accompanist Model will explain the history, technique and practice of creating and performing live musical scores to movies from cinema’s “silent era”. The program includes an informative slideshow, a demonstration of scoring a scene, and accompaniment to two silent film shorts. Registration is $15 in advance or $20 at the door. For more information or to register, please call 802-867-0111 or visit www.greenmtnacademy.org.

Time: 3/28/19 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Location: Manchester Community Library, Manchester Center
Mar
28
2019

Author Molly Millwood presents her new book, To Have and To Hold

Author Molly Millwood presents her new book, To Have and To Hold
Description:

Join Molly Millwood to celebrate the launch of her new book, To Have and To Hold: Motherhood, Marriage, and the Modern Dilemma, an exploration of the complexities of early motherhood, including its impact on a marriage, in a book that offers comfort, camaraderie, and practical guidance to new mothers. Dr. Molly Millwood holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology with advanced specialized training in marital therapy and intimate relationships.

Time: 3/28/19 6:30pm - 7:30pm
Location: Phoenix Books Burlington (191 Bank St), Burlington
Friday, March 29, 2019
Mar
29
2019

Ariel Lawhon discusses I Was Anastasia

Ariel Lawhon discusses I Was Anastasia
Description:

Please join us in welcoming back to the Northshire, Ariel Lawhon, a rising star of historical suspense and a staff favorite! She unravels the extraordinary twists and turns in Anna Anderson’s fifty-year battle to be recognized as Anastasia Romanov. Is she the beloved daughter, revered icon, and Russian grand duchess or is she an imposter, liar, and the thief of another woman’s legacy?

Although we all probably know the basic history of Anna Anderson and Anastasia, I found this book incredibly fascinating and hard to put down. The author chose to relate it in alternating chapters telling one person’s story chronologically and the other backwards through time, and only by the end do we know how it all started. Although a work of fiction, the author incorporates great historic details and draws you into the story with imagination. She brings to vivid life a mystery that mesmerized the world for much of the twentieth century, in an incredibly creative format. — Reviewed by Tambra Johnson Reap, Northshire Bookstore

Ariel Lawhon is a critically acclaimed author of historical fiction. She is the author of The Wife the Maid and the Mistress, Flight of Dreams, and I Was Anastasia. Her books have been translated into numerous languages and have been Library Reads, One Book One County, and Book of the Month Club selections. She is the co-founder of SheReads.org and lives in the rolling hills outside Nashville, Tennessee, with her husband, four sons, black Lab, and a deranged Siamese cat. Both pets are, thankfully, girls

Time: 3/29/19 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Location: Northshire Bookstore, Manchester Center
Saturday, March 30, 2019
Mar
30
2019

James Darius in Conversation with Pam Breaux

James Darius in Conversation with Pam Breaux
Description:

We are thrilled to welcome Darius James to Manchester as he presents a classic novel finally back in print! Negrophobia is a wild-eyed reckoning with the mutating insanity of American racism. A screenplay for the mind, a performance on the page, a work of poetry, a mad mix of genres and styles, a scabrous, truly hilarious, and deeply scary novel like no other.

For this free event, Darius will be in conversation with Pam Breaux the president and CEO of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies.

This feverish nightmare of racism is finally back in print after 25 years. Wickedly hilarious, raunchy, vile, and terrifying, Negrophobia is written as a screenplay whose racist protagonist Bubbles Brazil descends into a hallucinatory drug- and voodoo-induced phantasmagoria of black stereotypes. In just one sequence, Nazi-outfitted Disney characters celebrate the Last Supper with a plasticine Jesus as a skyscraper-sized African-American nose devised by the Zombie Master (and his trusted sidekicks Zombie Elvis and JFK’s head on spider legs) destroys the festivities! — Reviewed by Dafydd Wood, Northshire Bookstore

Time: 3/30/19 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Location: Northshire Bookstore, Manchester Center
Wednesday, April 3, 2019
Apr
3
2019

Curators in Conversation: A Tale of Two Figures

Curators in Conversation: A Tale of Two Figures
Description:

Reminding visitors of the apple trees that dot Shelburne Museum’s 45-acre campus, Apple Picking by Louise Ross (1913-2001) is a sculpture that might have appealed to museum founder Electra Havemeyer Webb’s penchant for narrative. The five-foot-tall figure’s story, however, may be more complicated than it first appears. New research has linked Apple Picking to a sculpture by Mary Anderson Clark (1910-1994) titled Harvest (1939) currently located in Peoria, Illinois. Join Associate Curator Katie Wood Kirchhoff to explore this WPA-era art history mystery, a twentieth-century tale of two figures.
3 p.m.
Free with Museum admission. Pre-registration not required but appreciation. To pre-register please visit:
https://curators_in_conversation_april3.eventbrite.com

Time: 4/3/19 3:00pm
Location: Shelburne Museum, Shelburne
Apr
3
2019

Life in the Studio

Life in the Studio
Description:

David Macaulay, award-winning author and illustrator of Castle, Cathedral, and The Way We Work, discusses current projects and challenges. Part of the First Wednesdays series, a Vermont Humanities Council program hosted by Manchester Community Library.

Time: 4/3/19 7:00pm
Location: First Congregational Church, Manchester
Apr
3
2019

Emily Dickinson: Poet of New England

Emily Dickinson: Poet of New England
Description:

Emily Dickinson lived her entire life in Amherst, Massachusetts. One of the greatest American poets, and probably the most important woman poet of all time, she was also a quintessential New England poet. UVM professor emeritus Huck Gutman explores what Dickinson can teach us. Part of the First Wednesdays series and PoemCity 2019 in Montpelier. A Vermont Humanities Council program hosted by Kellogg-Hubbard Library.

Time: 4/3/19 7:00pm
Location: Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier
Apr
3
2019

Vincent Van Gogh and the Books He Read

Vincent Van Gogh and the Books He Read
Description:

Van Gogh’s letters reveal that his paintings and drawings were inspired by his reading as well as by people, nature, and other painters’ work. Art historian Carol Berry shows the profound influence of the works of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and others on Van Gogh’s life and art. Part of the First Wednesdays series, a Vermont Humanities Council program hosted by St. Johnsbury Athenaeum.

Time: 4/3/19 7:00pm
Location: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, Saint Johnsbury
Wednesday, April 17, 2019
Apr
17
2019

Curators in Conversation: "She Paints Like a Man": The

Curators in Conversation: "She Paints Like a Man": The
Description:

“She Paints Like a Man:” The Radical Art and Life of Rosa Bonheur
Focusing on two extraordinary paintings from Shelburne Museum’s permanent collection— Sheep (c. 1860) and Foraging Party: Wild Boars in Fountainebleau Forest (1876) — this conversation, led by Assistant Curator, Carolyn Bauer, unveils the astonishing life and work of one of art history’s most celebrated and talented [female] artists.

Free with Museum admission. Pre-registration not required but appreciation. To pre-register please visit:
https://curators_in_conversation_april17.eventbrite.com

Time: 4/17/19 3:00pm
Location: Shelburne Museum, Shelburne
Wednesday, May 1, 2019
May
1
2019

Curators in Conversation: A Banner Year: 1843-44 and the End of the World

Curators in Conversation: A Banner Year: 1843-44 and the End of the World
Description:

A Banner Year: 1843-44 and the End of the World
Chief curator Kory Rogers will decipher the hidden meanings behind the fantastical beasts and complex religious iconography depicted on Shelburne Museum’s enigmatic Millerite banner made in the early 1840s. Measuring nearly 22 feet long and four feet tall, the large banner illustrates preacher William Miller’s complicated interpretation of The biblical Book of Revelations, which he read as signs that helped him calculate the exact date(s) of the apocalypse between 1843-44.
Free with Museum admission. Pre-registration is not required but appreciated. To pre-register, please visit:
https://curators_in_conversation_may1.eventbrite.com

Time: 5/1/19 3:00pm
Location: Shelburne Museum, Shelburne
Friday, May 10, 2019
May
10
2019

Sophie Shao and Friends

Sophie Shao and Friends
Description:

A perennial Middlebury favorite, cellist Sophie Shao has been praised by the World News for her “sensitive, stylistic playing, with great finesse, emotion, and gorgeous tone,” and has amassed an extensive collection of talented musical friends. She returns for her 11th consecutive season with an exciting new ensemble to perform rarely heard double-bass quintets, including Dvořák’s Op. 77 and Offenbach’s Divertimento über Schweizer Lieder, to celebrate Offenbach’s 200th birthday. A Performing Arts Series and Nelson Series event. Reserved seating.

Tickets: $28 Public/$22 Midd ID holders/$10 Youth/$6 Midd students.

Pre-concert lecture by Professor of Music Larry Hamberlin, 6:30 PM, Room 221.

Friday, May 10, 2019 - 7:30 PM

Time: 5/10/19 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Location: Mahaney Arts Center, Robison Hall, Middlebury