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Arts Calendar: Photography

Date

Region

Category

Monday, October 14, 2019
Aug
27
2019
– THRU –
Oct
20
2019

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

n November of 2018, Amy Davenport traveled for the first time in northern India, specifically to what is known as “the golden triangle” formed by Dehli, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri and Jaipur. I was told that India would overwhelm my senses, but even so I was not prepared for the visual splendor I found there. The colors were dazzling. The architecture was unlike anything
I had ever seen or experienced before. Attempting to capture as much of that beauty as I could with my camera quickly became an obsession. I was fascinated by the history – the
Mughal Emperors in Dehli and Agra, and the Maharajas in Rajasthan who built such stunning palaces, forts, mosques and tombs. For centuries, Muslims and Hindi were able to live peacefully in the Mughal Empire. Religious tolerance was considered a virtue. Within certain parameters, the art forms of the two cultures borrowed from one another, thereby enriching the beauty that each produced.

My photographs are divided into four groups: Architecture, the Taj Mahal, Women of India and a broad category I simply call Street Life. The captions shown with each group share more detailed information including location and what I observed and experienced. These photographs were taken with either my Panasonic Lumix or my 8s Plus iPhone. Had I known, or even imagined, the visual experience that was about to overwhelm me, I would have ignored the urge to pack light and included my Nikon…but hindsight is 20/20. I am, at best, an amateur photographer – someone who has always loved taking photographs but had no time to get serious about it until I retired from a 35-year career in the law.

8/27/19 9:00am - 10/20/19 12:00pm

THE GALLERY at Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin

Tuesday, October 15, 2019
Aug
27
2019
– THRU –
Oct
20
2019

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

n November of 2018, Amy Davenport traveled for the first time in northern India, specifically to what is known as “the golden triangle” formed by Dehli, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri and Jaipur. I was told that India would overwhelm my senses, but even so I was not prepared for the visual splendor I found there. The colors were dazzling. The architecture was unlike anything
I had ever seen or experienced before. Attempting to capture as much of that beauty as I could with my camera quickly became an obsession. I was fascinated by the history – the
Mughal Emperors in Dehli and Agra, and the Maharajas in Rajasthan who built such stunning palaces, forts, mosques and tombs. For centuries, Muslims and Hindi were able to live peacefully in the Mughal Empire. Religious tolerance was considered a virtue. Within certain parameters, the art forms of the two cultures borrowed from one another, thereby enriching the beauty that each produced.

My photographs are divided into four groups: Architecture, the Taj Mahal, Women of India and a broad category I simply call Street Life. The captions shown with each group share more detailed information including location and what I observed and experienced. These photographs were taken with either my Panasonic Lumix or my 8s Plus iPhone. Had I known, or even imagined, the visual experience that was about to overwhelm me, I would have ignored the urge to pack light and included my Nikon…but hindsight is 20/20. I am, at best, an amateur photographer – someone who has always loved taking photographs but had no time to get serious about it until I retired from a 35-year career in the law.

8/27/19 9:00am - 10/20/19 12:00pm

THE GALLERY at Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin

Wednesday, October 16, 2019
Aug
27
2019
– THRU –
Oct
20
2019

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

n November of 2018, Amy Davenport traveled for the first time in northern India, specifically to what is known as “the golden triangle” formed by Dehli, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri and Jaipur. I was told that India would overwhelm my senses, but even so I was not prepared for the visual splendor I found there. The colors were dazzling. The architecture was unlike anything
I had ever seen or experienced before. Attempting to capture as much of that beauty as I could with my camera quickly became an obsession. I was fascinated by the history – the
Mughal Emperors in Dehli and Agra, and the Maharajas in Rajasthan who built such stunning palaces, forts, mosques and tombs. For centuries, Muslims and Hindi were able to live peacefully in the Mughal Empire. Religious tolerance was considered a virtue. Within certain parameters, the art forms of the two cultures borrowed from one another, thereby enriching the beauty that each produced.

My photographs are divided into four groups: Architecture, the Taj Mahal, Women of India and a broad category I simply call Street Life. The captions shown with each group share more detailed information including location and what I observed and experienced. These photographs were taken with either my Panasonic Lumix or my 8s Plus iPhone. Had I known, or even imagined, the visual experience that was about to overwhelm me, I would have ignored the urge to pack light and included my Nikon…but hindsight is 20/20. I am, at best, an amateur photographer – someone who has always loved taking photographs but had no time to get serious about it until I retired from a 35-year career in the law.

8/27/19 9:00am - 10/20/19 12:00pm

THE GALLERY at Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin

Thursday, October 17, 2019
Oct
17
2019

Precolonial African Sexuality, Contemporary Homophobia and #LimitlessAfricans

Precolonial African Sexuality, Contemporary Homophobia and #LimitlessAfricans

Fulbright-winning artist Mikael Chukwuma Owunna discusses how Limit(less), his series of photographic portraits of LGBTQ+ Africans in diaspora, uses celebratory imagery to challenge a colonial legacy of homophobia. Meet the artist at a reception following this illustrated lecture. Free

10/17/19 7:00pm

Mahaney Arts Center, Dance Theatre, Middlebury

Aug
27
2019
– THRU –
Oct
20
2019

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

n November of 2018, Amy Davenport traveled for the first time in northern India, specifically to what is known as “the golden triangle” formed by Dehli, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri and Jaipur. I was told that India would overwhelm my senses, but even so I was not prepared for the visual splendor I found there. The colors were dazzling. The architecture was unlike anything
I had ever seen or experienced before. Attempting to capture as much of that beauty as I could with my camera quickly became an obsession. I was fascinated by the history – the
Mughal Emperors in Dehli and Agra, and the Maharajas in Rajasthan who built such stunning palaces, forts, mosques and tombs. For centuries, Muslims and Hindi were able to live peacefully in the Mughal Empire. Religious tolerance was considered a virtue. Within certain parameters, the art forms of the two cultures borrowed from one another, thereby enriching the beauty that each produced.

My photographs are divided into four groups: Architecture, the Taj Mahal, Women of India and a broad category I simply call Street Life. The captions shown with each group share more detailed information including location and what I observed and experienced. These photographs were taken with either my Panasonic Lumix or my 8s Plus iPhone. Had I known, or even imagined, the visual experience that was about to overwhelm me, I would have ignored the urge to pack light and included my Nikon…but hindsight is 20/20. I am, at best, an amateur photographer – someone who has always loved taking photographs but had no time to get serious about it until I retired from a 35-year career in the law.

8/27/19 9:00am - 10/20/19 12:00pm

THE GALLERY at Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin

Friday, October 18, 2019
Aug
27
2019
– THRU –
Oct
20
2019

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

n November of 2018, Amy Davenport traveled for the first time in northern India, specifically to what is known as “the golden triangle” formed by Dehli, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri and Jaipur. I was told that India would overwhelm my senses, but even so I was not prepared for the visual splendor I found there. The colors were dazzling. The architecture was unlike anything
I had ever seen or experienced before. Attempting to capture as much of that beauty as I could with my camera quickly became an obsession. I was fascinated by the history – the
Mughal Emperors in Dehli and Agra, and the Maharajas in Rajasthan who built such stunning palaces, forts, mosques and tombs. For centuries, Muslims and Hindi were able to live peacefully in the Mughal Empire. Religious tolerance was considered a virtue. Within certain parameters, the art forms of the two cultures borrowed from one another, thereby enriching the beauty that each produced.

My photographs are divided into four groups: Architecture, the Taj Mahal, Women of India and a broad category I simply call Street Life. The captions shown with each group share more detailed information including location and what I observed and experienced. These photographs were taken with either my Panasonic Lumix or my 8s Plus iPhone. Had I known, or even imagined, the visual experience that was about to overwhelm me, I would have ignored the urge to pack light and included my Nikon…but hindsight is 20/20. I am, at best, an amateur photographer – someone who has always loved taking photographs but had no time to get serious about it until I retired from a 35-year career in the law.

8/27/19 9:00am - 10/20/19 12:00pm

THE GALLERY at Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin

Saturday, October 19, 2019
Aug
27
2019
– THRU –
Oct
20
2019

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

n November of 2018, Amy Davenport traveled for the first time in northern India, specifically to what is known as “the golden triangle” formed by Dehli, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri and Jaipur. I was told that India would overwhelm my senses, but even so I was not prepared for the visual splendor I found there. The colors were dazzling. The architecture was unlike anything
I had ever seen or experienced before. Attempting to capture as much of that beauty as I could with my camera quickly became an obsession. I was fascinated by the history – the
Mughal Emperors in Dehli and Agra, and the Maharajas in Rajasthan who built such stunning palaces, forts, mosques and tombs. For centuries, Muslims and Hindi were able to live peacefully in the Mughal Empire. Religious tolerance was considered a virtue. Within certain parameters, the art forms of the two cultures borrowed from one another, thereby enriching the beauty that each produced.

My photographs are divided into four groups: Architecture, the Taj Mahal, Women of India and a broad category I simply call Street Life. The captions shown with each group share more detailed information including location and what I observed and experienced. These photographs were taken with either my Panasonic Lumix or my 8s Plus iPhone. Had I known, or even imagined, the visual experience that was about to overwhelm me, I would have ignored the urge to pack light and included my Nikon…but hindsight is 20/20. I am, at best, an amateur photographer – someone who has always loved taking photographs but had no time to get serious about it until I retired from a 35-year career in the law.

8/27/19 9:00am - 10/20/19 12:00pm

THE GALLERY at Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin

Sunday, October 20, 2019
Aug
27
2019
– THRU –
Oct
20
2019

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

Visual Splendor of Northern India. Photographs by Amy Davenport

n November of 2018, Amy Davenport traveled for the first time in northern India, specifically to what is known as “the golden triangle” formed by Dehli, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri and Jaipur. I was told that India would overwhelm my senses, but even so I was not prepared for the visual splendor I found there. The colors were dazzling. The architecture was unlike anything
I had ever seen or experienced before. Attempting to capture as much of that beauty as I could with my camera quickly became an obsession. I was fascinated by the history – the
Mughal Emperors in Dehli and Agra, and the Maharajas in Rajasthan who built such stunning palaces, forts, mosques and tombs. For centuries, Muslims and Hindi were able to live peacefully in the Mughal Empire. Religious tolerance was considered a virtue. Within certain parameters, the art forms of the two cultures borrowed from one another, thereby enriching the beauty that each produced.

My photographs are divided into four groups: Architecture, the Taj Mahal, Women of India and a broad category I simply call Street Life. The captions shown with each group share more detailed information including location and what I observed and experienced. These photographs were taken with either my Panasonic Lumix or my 8s Plus iPhone. Had I known, or even imagined, the visual experience that was about to overwhelm me, I would have ignored the urge to pack light and included my Nikon…but hindsight is 20/20. I am, at best, an amateur photographer – someone who has always loved taking photographs but had no time to get serious about it until I retired from a 35-year career in the law.

8/27/19 9:00am - 10/20/19 12:00pm

THE GALLERY at Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin

Tuesday, October 29, 2019
Oct
29
2019

Susan Morse presents COMING SOON: THE COUGAR RETURNS TO VERMONT

Susan Morse presents COMING SOON: THE COUGAR RETURNS TO VERMONT

We've all heard of sightings, tracks in the snow, even bodies beside the highways, but have our legendary Catamounts really come back to New England? Vermont native and internationally renowned wildlife biologist and tracker Susan Morse brings her stunning photographs and research on North American cougars to Fairlee as the first in FCA's new series of lectures on the environment and people of the Upper Valley. Tickets $10 student, $15 adult at www.fairleearts.org

10/29/19 6:30pm - 8:30pm

Fairlee Town Hall Auditorium, Fairlee

Wednesday, November 6, 2019
Nov
6
2019

Photography as Social Justice

Photography as Social Justice

In conjunction with her 45-year career retrospective exhibition at Castleton University, Dona Ann McAdams sits down with curator John Killacky to discuss her work, and shows her empathetic black-and-white portraits of performing artists, AIDS activists, political protests, people living with schizophrenia, Appalachian farmers, cloistered nuns, and others. Part of the First Wednesdays series, a Vermont Humanities Council program hosted by Rutland Free Library.

11/6/19 7:00pm

Rutland Free Library, Rutland

Saturday, November 9, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Sunday, November 10, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Monday, November 11, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Tuesday, November 12, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Wednesday, November 13, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Thursday, November 14, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Friday, November 15, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Saturday, November 16, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Sunday, November 17, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Monday, November 18, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Tuesday, November 19, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Wednesday, November 20, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Thursday, November 21, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Friday, November 22, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

Saturday, November 23, 2019
Nov
9
2019
– THRU –
Mar
8
2020

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography

Time Lapse: Contemporary Analog Photography celebrates the work of 14 international and national contemporary artists who use the darkroom as a type of laboratory and find inspiration in the vast array of 19th-century photographic processes, from daguerreotypes to photograms. Experimenting with the mutable medium of photography and employing a variety of materials—from cyanotype dresses made of tamale wrappers to a three-dimensional shelter displaying tintype portraits—these artists depict familiar subjects of landscapes, portraiture, and still life through a contemporary lens.

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne