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Arts Calendar: Literary Arts in Central Vermont

Date

Region

Category

Sunday, July 28, 2019
Jul
28
2019

Life on the Other Border

Life on the Other Border

Teresa M. Mares, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Vermont, will speak about food insecurity experienced by migrant farmworkers in the northeastern borderlands of the United States. Mares’ research is based on Latinx farmworkers who labor in Vermont’s dairy industry. She will illuminate the complex and resilient ways workers sustain themselves and their families while also serving as the backbone of the state’s agricultural economy. Copies of her book, Life on the Other Border, will be available for sale and signing.

7/28/19 3:00pm

Rokeby Museum, Ferrisburg

Sunday, September 8, 2019
Sep
8
2019

When the Church and Republicans Were Radical: Reconstruction, 1862–1895

When the Church and Republicans Were Radical: Reconstruction, 1862–1895

Dr. Elise Guyette will present an illustrated talk delving into the widely misunderstood history of Reconstruction using South Carolina as an example. Dr. Guyette focuses on Radical Republicans and missionaries who flocked to South Carolina even before the war ended to assist freedmen and women in creating better lives. The talk features Vermonters, including a man who once worked at Rokeby, and explains many actions and policies still affecting the nation today. Elise Guyette is the author of Discovering Black Vermont: African American Farmers in Hinesburgh, 1790–1890 (2011), and is the co-founder of the Burlington Edible History Tour.

9/8/19 3:00pm

Rokeby Museum, Ferrisburg

Sunday, September 22, 2019
Sep
22
2019

Dr. Emily Bernard — BLACK IS THE BODY: Stories from My Grandmother’s Time, My Mother’s Time, and Mine

Dr. Emily Bernard — BLACK IS THE BODY: Stories from My Grandmother’s Time, My Mother’s Time, and Mine

“I am black—and brown, too,” writes Emily Bernard. “Brown is the body I was born into. Black is the body of the stories I tell.” In a collection of twelve deeply personal and interconnected essays Emily Bernard explores the nuances and paradoxes of her identity — as a woman who grew up black in the south and who married a white man from the north, as a black professor teaching mostly white students in Vermont about race, as a mother who adopted two babies from Ethiopia. This fearless and penetrating memoir has been lauded as “contemplative and compassionate” (Publishers Weekly) and “deeply felt, unflinchingly honest, and openly questioning” (Kirkus). Emily Bernard author of Remember Me to Harlem: The Letters of Langston Hughes and Carl Van Vechten, and is professor of Critical Race and Ethnic studies at the University of Vermont.

9/22/19 3:00pm

Rokeby Museum, Ferrisburg