Skip to Content

Featured Stories

Building It Better

Building It Better

Posted: September 27, 2018

Leo Vazquez is a leader in creative placemaking and cultural competency — two currently hot fields in urban planning. He has decades of experience in community development and community engagement. He facilitates small groups, fosters local economic development, develops leadership, and publishes strategic communications. He’s the winner of national awards and has written for professional and general-interest publications. A bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University and advanced degrees in planning from the University of Southern California have enabled him to navigate shifting personal priorities throughout his career. When asked what inspires him right now, his answer is quick and direct: Read More
Macaulay in Montpelier Explained

Macaulay in Montpelier Explained

Posted: September 12, 2018

Original drawings for eight of David Macaulay's publications hang in the Spotlight Gallery until November 2. Macaulay dubs himself an "explainer." He offered these words about each of the books. Mill (1983) Having lived in southern New England since 1962, I finally became curious about all the mills and mill towns and villages I’d been driving past for much of that time. I then did what I always do when this kind of thing happens. I started taking pictures, finding books on the subject, and introducing myself to experts who might be able and willing to help. Fortunately, I haven’t met an expert yet who was unwilling to guide me through their unfamiliar but intriguing territory. The story in the book traces the evolution of mill architecture and engineering through an imaginary 19th-century Rhode Island community. Read More
Grant Seeker Workshops: Public Art

Grant Seeker Workshops: Public Art

Posted: August 30, 2018

Information sessions for the Animating Infrastructure Grant program will be held September 24-October 26. The program is designed to encourage communities to engage artists in the planning, design and/or fabrication of public art in infrastructure projects and to encourage thinking beyond the ordinary as concepts for new buildings, roads, bridges, and other public spaces are developed. Participants will learn about the application process, and will have time to brainstorm ideas for projects in their community. Sessions are led by Michele Bailey, senior program manager at the Vermont Arts Council. Anyone wanting to learn more about this grant program is encouraged to attend. Read More
Embracing Advocacy

Embracing Advocacy

Posted: August 30, 2018

True story: A Vermont music teacher is ready to return to school when she’s notified by the principal that ensembles have been cut. She calls on her advocates at hand. There are meetings and maybe some confrontation. Within weeks, music is back in the curriculum. It doesn’t always work like that. Cuts can come at a point that is too late. Supporting the arts in education is ongoing work. So, as you finish shopping for school supplies, learning the idiosyncrasies of the bus route, and adjusting to waking up just a little earlier to deal with lunches, we add one more request. Think arts in schools, and stand ready to get involved. Read More
Let the Renewed Work Begin!

Let the Renewed Work Begin!

Posted: August 15, 2018

Upcoming grant rounds for the Artists in Schools and Animating Infrastructure Grant programs will speak volumes about the Council's priorities in grantmaking. We leave the ignition of wonder and insight in classrooms and communities to qualified, skilled professionals — the celebrated artists of Vermont. In supporting their work, we strive to expand arts opportunities, cultivate creative placemaking, and energize Vermont's creative economy. These concepts are not new; it is with renewed focus the Council pushes them into the limelight. These excerpts from our last Annual Report foreshadowed the direction of the Council's grantmaking. Read More
Reasserting a Right

Reasserting a Right

Posted: August 2, 2018

Seven speakers and three performers will take the stage at the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center in Stowe Saturday, August 4. Each will explore, through the lens of the arts, the topic of women and power. “Reclamation” at Stowe’s Helen Day Art Center is the show from which these talks spring. Portraits of women, painted by women, and curated by women express joy, fear, solidarity, defiance, and wondering. Twenty-three paintings and two lithographs make an exhibit inspired by the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements. The art asks to be witnessed, celebrated, and discussed. Through these acts power is taken back, which is reclamation. Read More