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Category: Vermont Arts Organizations

Building the Barrette

Building the Barrette

Posted: March 16, 2018

A beautiful new arts center opened in the heart of White River Junction's downtown in 2015. The Barrette Center for the Arts houses an intimate 240 seat modified thrust performance space and has all the technical capabilities you would hope for. The backstage supports large and small cast productions with rehearsal space matched to the size of the stage used in performance. The lobby is fronted by an outdoor plaza and is enclosed by an inviting windowed street front. The building and spaces within the building have been designed to meet accessibility needs — including an assisted listening system in the theater itself. Managing Director Eric Bunge reported, "People tell us the Barrette Center for the Arts is their favorite place to see live theater. We couldn't ask for a better testimonial." Then, he told us more. Read More
Grant Seeker Workshops: Cultural Facilities and Historic Preservation

Grant Seeker Workshops: Cultural Facilities and Historic Preservation

Posted: January 31, 2018

The Vermont Arts Council, the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation, and the Preservation Trust of Vermont are partnering to host three workshops in March. Anyone interested in applying for a facilities grant through either the Cultural Facilities or Historic Preservation Grant programs is encouraged to attend one of the sessions. This is also an excellent opportunity to learn more about the Preservation Trust’s programs. Read More
Spread the News

Spread the News

Posted: January 17, 2018

If Bad News Fatigue Syndrome (BNFS) is real, we are all at risk. Every day we hear about forests burning, cities flooding, and hands reaching for scary buttons. This nonstop outpouring of concerning information can be overwhelming. If good news can serve as an antidote to BNFS, we are lucky to be in Vermont — a funky little state with abundant art. Creativity is considered an asset. Communities support artistic enterprises, and more and more children are reaping the benefits of arts in education. There is good news here. We need to hear it, and we need to share it. As Erin Narey from Catamount Arts in St. Johnsbury enthused, “Good news? I am all about it.” Read More
The Arts Mean Business

The Arts Mean Business

Posted: October 4, 2017

In Vermont, nonprofit arts and culture make up a larger than $123 million industry supporting thousands of jobs. The sector also generates millions of dollars in revenue to local and state government. These are just two important facts supported by data from the Americans for the Arts' fifth iteration of the Arts & Economic Prosperity Study (AEP5). Eighty-eight Vermont organizations participated in this yearlong, nationwide survey to assess the economic impact of the arts. What is true across the nation is true in our state: Arts and culture are one and the same as economic development. It's not an either/or choice. Read More
An Art-Packed Summer Day

An Art-Packed Summer Day

Posted: July 20, 2017

In “Summer Blues,” Vermont poet David Budbill laments, “Ninety days is what we get, just Ninety days of frost free weather.” He then instructs, “we Just got to get outside and get together!” As the frost-free days accumulate, the Vermont Arts Calendar swells to include hundreds of events. Choosing becomes overwhelming. I find help in “How to Art Pack Your Day in Ten Easy Steps,” first published in July 2015. I begin by selecting my last stop: Rutland. A mural by Bill Ramage piques my interest. I'll follow it with free movie night at the Paramount. I decide to stay off the interstate. As I meander, I mentally highlight this part of tip #8: “Art can be found in the most surprising places.” I hit pay dirt on my first stop. Read More
Compassionate Community

Compassionate Community

Posted: June 22, 2017

It’s just after 6:30 Thursday evening. I enter Burlington’s Town Center Mall and scan the directory for Victoria’s Secret. The group I’m looking for meets in an empty store across the hall from the lingerie boutique. Two bassists, a cellist, and an equal smattering of violinists and wind players are sitting on folding chairs warming up their instruments. Caroline Whiddon manages the group. She moves from the front of the room to the back, stopping to answer questions, check in, and hand out tickets for the upcoming concert. Other musicians filter in. When it’s close to 7:00, Ronald Braunstein arrives. He is the conductor, but it is a violinist who first takes the podium. She tells the players to put both feet on the ground. They do. She visibly inhales then exhales, gesturing with her arms as she breathes. Read More