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Category: Vermont Arts Organizations

Reasserting a Right

Reasserting a Right

Posted: August 2, 2018

Seven speakers and three performers will take the stage at the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center in Stowe Saturday, August 4. Each will explore, through the lens of the arts, the topic of women and power. “Reclamation” at Stowe’s Helen Day Art Center is the show from which these talks spring. Portraits of women, painted by women, and curated by women express joy, fear, solidarity, defiance, and wondering. Twenty-three paintings and two lithographs make an exhibit inspired by the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements. The art asks to be witnessed, celebrated, and discussed. Through these acts power is taken back, which is reclamation. Read More
Centered in Greensboro

Centered in Greensboro

Posted: July 19, 2018

The Highland Center for the Arts opened in Greensboro in May 2017. The Center operates with the vision of a balanced, year-round schedule of locally and nationally recognized artists and events suited to serving the community. The campus is designed to provide opportunities to create, exhibit, view, experience, perform, learn about, and talk about art. In one day there may be a sold-out performance in the ultramodern 250-seat theater, a rehearsal of local dance group, a film screening, tourists visiting the art gallery, and diners enjoying coffee and local food in the cafe. Executive Director Annie Houston took time from her busy schedule to talk about the new facility. Read More
Celebrating New American Artists

Celebrating New American Artists

Posted: July 5, 2018

Photographs hanging in the Spotlight Gallery beginning July 10 honor the work of seven groups of artists. Music, dance, and fiber art traditions of Somali, Nepali, Burmese, Burundian, Tibetan, and Bosnian people are represented. There are important through lines. New Americans living in Vermont are making the art. They gather as a part of the Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program – an initiative of the Vermont Folklife Center. The Apprenticeship Program was one of the many passions of Gregory Sharrow, whose life ended earlier this year. Greg left an impressive legacy; the enduring practices shown in the images give credit to a minute portion his substantial work. Through the continuity of these art forms, Greg's service to foklife will remain alive in Vermont for generations to come. Read More
Eight Vermont Museums: Each One-of-a-Kind

Eight Vermont Museums: Each One-of-a-Kind

Posted: June 20, 2018

The long days of summer allow a slower pace. There’s time for summit hikes, lake paddles, and games of Frisbee or catch. But don’t let your body have all the fun. Vermont has a wealth of museums that provide a dose of culture and things that make you go “hmm.” Many simply could not exist anywhere else; they represent the ingenuity or aspirations of a single person or group. These stops tell about the communities in which they reside, often with roots to local people, industries, arts, or town histories. Plus, they’re easy on the wallet (five bucks or less). Whether you check out the one closest to home or make it a road trip, get out and explore. Read More
TLC: Something to Hold On To

TLC: Something to Hold On To

Posted: June 7, 2018

Vermont Arts Exchange (VAE) has built a reputation over almost 25 years of turning trash into treasure. The organization has therefore become a depository for strange and unusual items. One donation years ago showed up in the form of over 50 plaster molds. These included baby doll parts: round plump heads, angelic arms, and chubby legs. Various objects and sculptures were created with these — all reminiscent of Tim Burton’s Gothic world — until the molds found another purpose. Within a ceramics class, VAE teaching artist Kristen Blaker and the residents at the Vermont School for Girls (VSG) actually started making dolls; clay was pressed into the molds and parts were fired. The assembly of hand-sewn and stuffed bodies came into play. Wigs, bonnets, and dresses were made, faces delicately painted. Read More
A Classic(al) Example

A Classic(al) Example

Posted: May 24, 2018

The features read like a wish list. Start with rehearsal spaces for performance groups. Add a percussion studio, a recital hall within the music education building, and a performance-quality auditorium that seats 224. A green room? Adjacent. There are fourteen teaching studios and a large multi-use classroom for programs and community music projects. Considerations have been made throughout for quality acoustics and physical accessibility. There's more: A music library, archive, and inventory of instruments. A designated faculty lounge and work area and a welcoming space for families and students. Convenient parking. Read More