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Category: Vermont Arts Organizations

Passion at Work

Passion at Work

Posted: December 6, 2018

“It’s really a blessing when you get to love what you do.” Heather Geoffrey, the new managing director at Main Street Arts in Saxtons River said that about her job. Few people are as qualified as she to make that statement. Heather teaches people to uncover self-expression through art and through the shaping of their life. She has decades of experience in nonprofits; having served as education and outreach coordinator, executive administrator, assistant director, and director in different organizations. She is also an artist, painter, poet, and photographer. She is a teacher. How about mystic or healer? "All of those are accurate," she says. Read More
Cultural Leaders Take Action

Cultural Leaders Take Action

Posted: December 6, 2018

In response to an increase in hate crimes in Vermont, nearly 60 cultural organizations in the state have signed this statement promoting inclusion, respect, and change in their communities: Last month, the FBI reported that hate crimes in Vermont increased for the second year in a row, and are now at their highest level since 1995. The evidence of escalating hatred and bigotry is right here in Vermont. There are dozens of examples from Burlington to Brattleboro, St. Johnsbury to Bennington. As cultural leaders, we stand against hate and violence and we will take action. Read More
Second Stage Brings Second Act

Second Stage Brings Second Act

Posted: October 25, 2018

The Weston Playhouse Theatre Company has operated in the heart of Weston since 1937. In September 2017, funded by a $13 million capital campaign, the company opened a new space on an historic farm at the north end of the village. At that time, Producing Artistic Director Steve Stettler explained, “We will, of course, continue to offer great summer shows in the Weston Playhouse, but this project will allow us to extend our reach.” The additional building was made to accommodate shows that need flexible space, to expand the season, and to provide a place for other community events. Read More
Reasserting a Right

Reasserting a Right

Posted: August 2, 2018

Seven speakers and three performers will take the stage at the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center in Stowe Saturday, August 4. Each will explore, through the lens of the arts, the topic of women and power. “Reclamation” at Stowe’s Helen Day Art Center is the show from which these talks spring. Portraits of women, painted by women, and curated by women express joy, fear, solidarity, defiance, and wondering. Twenty-three paintings and two lithographs make an exhibit inspired by the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements. The art asks to be witnessed, celebrated, and discussed. Through these acts power is taken back, which is reclamation. Read More
Centered in Greensboro

Centered in Greensboro

Posted: July 19, 2018

The Highland Center for the Arts opened in Greensboro in May 2017. The Center operates with the vision of a balanced, year-round schedule of locally and nationally recognized artists and events suited to serving the community. The campus is designed to provide opportunities to create, exhibit, view, experience, perform, learn about, and talk about art. In one day there may be a sold-out performance in the ultramodern 250-seat theater, a rehearsal of local dance group, a film screening, tourists visiting the art gallery, and diners enjoying coffee and local food in the cafe. Executive Director Annie Houston took time from her busy schedule to talk about the new facility. Read More
Celebrating New American Artists

Celebrating New American Artists

Posted: July 5, 2018

Photographs hanging in the Spotlight Gallery beginning July 10 honor the work of seven groups of artists. Music, dance, and fiber art traditions of Somali, Nepali, Burmese, Burundian, Tibetan, and Bosnian people are represented. There are important through lines. New Americans living in Vermont are making the art. They gather as a part of the Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program – an initiative of the Vermont Folklife Center. The Apprenticeship Program was one of the many passions of Gregory Sharrow, whose life ended earlier this year. Greg left an impressive legacy; the enduring practices shown in the images give credit to a minute portion his substantial work. Through the continuity of these art forms, Greg's service to foklife will remain alive in Vermont for generations to come. Read More