Skip to Content

Tag: Vermont artist

Symbolic Landscapes

Symbolic Landscapes

Posted: August 18, 2016

Elizabeth Nelson has painted since she was eight. Her work has been shown since the late 1980s and has been presented in juried shows for nearly as long. Well-known for her images of northeastern landscapes, she is represented by galleries in New York and Vermont and has won commissions for public art. Liz is neither a young nor obscure artist; years of experience inform her painting. Reflecting on that, she said, "Every so often artists come to the end of what they're exploring. They have to ask, 'Where do I go from here?'" 2012 was one of those times. She wanted to transform her art. Read More
Both Scientific and Mystical

Both Scientific and Mystical

Posted: July 7, 2016

"My husband and I have traveled widely..." So opens Amanda Amend's artist statement for "Viajes (Travels)." It's true; the couple has covered some ground. All over the U.S. and Europe. North Africa. Central America. But when you talk to Amanda about her watercolors, you hear of another journey: her move away from the Pluperfect Subjunctive. Read More
Mountains of Art

Mountains of Art

Posted: May 25, 2016

Chasing along the spine of Vermont’s beloved Green Mountains, towns and villages that were established as farming and ski communities have grown into some of the state’s most thriving arts hubs. In Vermont, the arts are as rich as the soil and steadfast as thru-hikers on the Long Trail. The state's landscape — with its valleys and dynamic mountains — has both inspired and integrated the arts into its environment. In this light, the Vermont Arts Council and the Green Mountain Club, stewards of the nation’s oldest long distance hiking trail, the 273 mile Long Trail, have partnered to provide arts and outdoors enthusiasts a collection of recommended communities that offer excellent arts and hiking opportunities. Read More
Tempesta’s Landscapes and Wildlife

Tempesta’s Landscapes and Wildlife

Posted: April 28, 2016

"Wait. Those aren't photographs." That's something you might overhear as people look at the careful art of Gabriel Tempesta. Fastidious details construct near-perfect representations of nature. Trees. Bees. The ocean. A giant monarch butterfly. The older works are made mostly with charcoal and water on Claybord; sometimes, casein paint. Gabe described working on Claybord this way: "You can erase, scratch into it, lift off tiny white lines." Read More
Celebrating Circular Earth

Celebrating Circular Earth

Posted: March 3, 2016

It's early March. Snow and rain take turns icing the roads as Dianne Shullenberger installs a new show in the Spotlight Gallery. She's hanging twenty-one sculptures, all constructed with objects found in nature. This is mostly new work; an exhibit Dianne says she enjoyed putting together, "just because of working with something so large." (She usually builds layered fabric collage.) "The materials were so specific, and that I love." The materials are rocks, leaves, bark, seeds, and sticks. All but three of the sculptures are round. The rectangular pieces contain circular elements. The whole body of work is called "Circular Earth." Read More
A View to the Souls of Animals

A View to the Souls of Animals

Posted: January 21, 2016

The glisten in the eye of this rooster is one bright detail sparkling in the Council’s Spotlight Gallery. Twenty paintings of roosters, sheep, cows, and owls project emotion to the hallways. This is the work of Caryn King, an artist living and working in South Newfane. For the last ten years, she has painted animals. It started with a rooster. “I never painted, I always designed and taught and did a lot of artwork. Always art. But I was intimidated by a white canvas.” She felt stuck at the beginning, wondering, “What do you do? You have to put yourself on the canvas. Finally, my son wanted a rooster, and I painted him a rooster. And, that was it.” It was easy after that. Her subject matter? "Animals… I just love them. So, it was kind of was a natural." Read More