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Category: Spotlight Gallery

The Art of Chance

The Art of Chance

Posted: April 27, 2017

Laura Jane Walker calls her pieces paintings and says the colored threads are brush strokes. The threads run inches or feet between nails in plywood. Some of the panels are brightly colored, some shimmer, some have only earth tones. The newest employ seed-shaped divots carved into the wood. All are built around a chance event — a spilled cup of coffee, an I Ching coin toss, a burn. Read More
An Artist Evolves

An Artist Evolves

Posted: February 2, 2017

Kathy Stark's first winter in Vermont was in the year 2000. Right away, she began to capture "the season's subtle variation in color" on her canvases. At first glance, those paintings appear a bit barren. A more sustained look uncovers the artist's characteristic marks, lines, movements, and patterns set into paint. Two of those pieces are in the exhibit called "… and the journey continues …" now in the Spotlight Gallery. They are both from a series called White Works. Five different series are represented in the show. Read More
Light in the Spotlight

Light in the Spotlight

Posted: November 9, 2016

The paintings are not meek. The frames are substantial, the pigment often dark and generously applied. The drawings are accurate and balanced. Many of the pieces reference relationships: a farmer with a cow, a man and his son, musicians playing their instruments. There are still lifes: a rose, apples, a whimsical kitchen accessory. Three nudes are sketched with Conté Crayon. This is the work of Katie Runde, now hanging in the Spotlight Gallery. The show's title, "Etudes," tells you something about the artist. Read More
Symbolic Landscapes

Symbolic Landscapes

Posted: August 18, 2016

Elizabeth Nelson has painted since she was eight. Her work has been shown since the late 1980s and has been presented in juried shows for nearly as long. Well-known for her images of northeastern landscapes, she is represented by galleries in New York and Vermont and has won commissions for public art. Liz is neither a young nor obscure artist; years of experience inform her painting. Reflecting on that, she said, "Every so often artists come to the end of what they're exploring. They have to ask, 'Where do I go from here?'" 2012 was one of those times. She wanted to transform her art. Read More
Both Scientific and Mystical

Both Scientific and Mystical

Posted: July 7, 2016

"My husband and I have traveled widely..." So opens Amanda Amend's artist statement for "Viajes (Travels)." It's true; the couple has covered some ground. All over the U.S. and Europe. North Africa. Central America. But when you talk to Amanda about her watercolors, you hear of another journey: her move away from the Pluperfect Subjunctive. Read More
Tempesta’s Landscapes and Wildlife

Tempesta’s Landscapes and Wildlife

Posted: April 28, 2016

"Wait. Those aren't photographs." That's something you might overhear as people look at the careful art of Gabriel Tempesta. Fastidious details construct near-perfect representations of nature. Trees. Bees. The ocean. A giant monarch butterfly. The older works are made mostly with charcoal and water on Claybord; sometimes, casein paint. Gabe described working on Claybord this way: "You can erase, scratch into it, lift off tiny white lines." Read More